• I had a gray '89 LX 5.0 notchback about 20+ years ago. Being that it was the lightest of the bunch it was also the quickest. After owning a couple hatch models, I must say I dig the simplicity of the notchback. The '86 to '93 years really had a strong short block right from the factory. My '86 was converted to an '89 ecu/mass air system + everything North of the short block had been upgraded via Ford Motorsport's SVO/GT-40 package (ie, heads, cam, roller rockers, upper/low intake, long tubes, etc). Even after almost 40k miles with the engine upgrades (100k+ miles when I eventually solid it) coupled with a fair amount of street racing for a few years, it still ran like a top, no blue smoke, etc. Miss those cars!

  • Vince, regarding the fastback/notchback coolness inversion:

    The older Mustangs were true fastbacks, with separate small trunk lids.

    The Mustang II and Fox went to a hatchback type design where the rear window glass lifted up with the lid, but kept the conventional notchback as an option.

    Maybe this has something to do with Fox notches being cooler? Could we say that any Mustang with a separate trunk lid is therefore more desirable than one with a glass hatch?

    Note that the later generations starting with SN-95 and continuing through today all have separate trunk lids, even though they feature fastback styling.

    • >> Note that the later generations starting with SN-95 and continuing
      >> through today all have separate trunk lids, even though they feature
      >> fastback styling.

      Sort of on that note, I think the demise of that big hatch had something to do with the need for more stiffness in the chassis. The Fox bodies had a bit of a reputation for flex and more B pillar/slightly longer roof line helped that.

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