11 Comments

  1. sean scott
    September 22, 2015 @ 10:54 pm

    Thanks for the write-up of The Coronado Speed Festival. It is a really fun event.
    A few year ago I went and had a blast. There were two areas where one could drive new Corvettes, Camaros and AMG Mercedes. It is a neat track to watch the racing because you can see basically see every turn.
    img] i10.photobucket.com/albums/a106/sscott55/1%201%20copy_zpshfig0g9s.jpg[/img]

    • sean scott
      September 22, 2015 @ 10:56 pm

      [img] i10.photobucket.com/albums/a106/sscott55/1%201%20copy_zpshfig0g9s.jpg[/img]

    • Hunsbloger
      September 23, 2015 @ 4:46 am

      +10!

  2. Zach
    September 22, 2015 @ 11:51 pm

    Random useless knowledge – I know that the TR3 was the first [british?] production car fitted with disc brakes.

    [update] Aha, Wikipedia indicates that the Citroen DS was first to the punch in '55, with the TR3 being fitted in '56.

  3. The Road Whisperer
    September 23, 2015 @ 7:18 am

    Schrodinger's Car.

  4. The Road Whisperer
    September 23, 2015 @ 7:18 am

    Schrodinger's Car.

    • Hunsbloger
      September 24, 2015 @ 4:25 am

      Good one. Cars are better than cats any day.

  5. Unknown
    September 24, 2015 @ 4:06 am

    I'm really curious how that Cord is getting it's power to the front wheels. Let's see, it is longitudinally mounted, so that eliminates 99% of transaxles. The engine turns the opposite way as "normal" engines, so that leaves out an Olds Toronado unit (right?) I am guessing either voodoo or quantum entanglement.

    • Hunsbloger
      September 24, 2015 @ 4:24 am

      Andy, I shared your curiosity so I looked under the hood and tried to peak at the front suspension. The engine is just moved forward from its original location in a Corvair, so the transmission is in 'front' of it, so the rotation is the same as driving the rear of the Corvair. Half shafts and CV joints to the front wheels. The part I failed to look at more closely was the shift linkage which is running towards the rear instead of towards the front where it ends up coming out of the dash like a Citroen 2CV.

    • Unknown
      September 24, 2015 @ 5:04 am

      Hmm. I assumed that making the wheels turn on a Corvair transaxle would be impossible. I figured steering linkages on FWD cars had to be engineered into the transaxle to work. A lot of moving planes of rotation, clearances and stuff come into play.
      Wonder if a retrofit kit is out there. I would make a twin-engined 4WD Corvair Greenbrier camper!

    • Hunsbloger
      September 25, 2015 @ 6:23 am

      4WD Greenbrier couldn't be much worse in the front than an early Econoline, Chevy or Dodge A100. I wish I'd been able to see what the spindles and a-arms looked like as I had many of the same concerns you do.

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