• I had two of these in the past. They are, indeed, rugged but are prone to some issues like the awfully complex heat/air conditioning system, window regulators that break, self-leveling rear suspension and other items. BUT, they are fairly easy to work on, parts are plentiful and at 157K, this example is barely broken in. My first 300TD wagon was sold with 359K and my second had over 200K when sold. Ditch the newer style wheels for some Bundts or even steel wheels with color coordinated wheel covers! Another 200,000 on the clock is certainly do-able.

  • I've been driving a 300 Mercedes wagon since 1991, over which time I've owned two such cars and put on combined mileage of some 500k. In both cases I've owned the TE version, as opposed to the TD version, and found them to be extremely reliable and capable of carrying almost everything, either in the spacious rear or the robust roof rack. I've learned that maintenance can be made very economical by avoiding taking my wagon to Mercedes Benz Canada for service, and instead where possible I order parts on line from US parts suppliers who are prepared to supply parts at US prices and not some hyped-up overcharged price.

  • ~ i haven't seen a diesel – stick shift Mercedes wagon of this period. that is one i'd label a keeper. i enjoyed the 300 CD – automatic i was driving until cold weather dictated its sale.

  • I had an '84 300TD turbo wagon, just like this one except not quite as nice. Before I sold it, I found an aluminum-cased 4-spd manual trans from a later W123 240D (base 4-cyl, non-turbo) sedan. If I had kept the car I would've done the swap and improved the driving experience immensely. To DT's knowledge, there was no manual W123 wagon offered in the US…but you can find them as grey-market imports occasionally.

  • It is a wonderful car. This model has lots of different features that are not available in modern Mercedes models.

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